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Clemmonsdogpark IELTS Podcast: English Vocabulary You Need to Know

Listen to the Clemmonsdogpark IELTS podcast and learn the English vocabulary words you need to know to get a higher IELTS band score.

Click the link to any episode to listen and learn more!

Vocabulary Lesson 1: Information
Vocabulary Lesson 2: Environment
Vocabulary Lesson 3: Weather
Vocabulary Lesson 4: Technology
Vocabulary Lesson 5: Travel

Clemmonsdogpark IELTS Podcast

Vocabulary Lesson 1: Information

Listen and subscribe on or . Or listen right here:

In this episode of the Clemmonsdogpark IELTS podcast, your teacher Eliot Friesen explains how to use four words all related to giving and receiving information: Interpret, Assume, Perceive, and React.

You’ll see this vocabulary in the reading passages on your IELTS exam. These words will also be useful as you’re writing responses to your task one and task two questions.

If you like this lesson, please subscribe on or for more IELTS Vocabulary lessons!

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IELTS Podcast – Episode 1 Transcript

Welcome to the Clemmonsdogpark IELTS Vocabulary Podcast. This is Lesson 1. In this episode, we will cover 4 words all related to information: Interpret, Assume, Perceive, and React

Don’t forget to check out our show notes for a link to your free IELTS vocabulary list containing these words and others, and visit IELTS.Clemmonsdogpark.com for more great resources to improve your IELTS band score.

Let’s get started.

I’d like to introduce you to your teacher, Eliot. He is the Clemmonsdogpark IELTS expert and, here’s a fun fact about Eliot: he does not like watermelon!

Eliot Intro

Hello Clemmonsdogpark IELTS podcast listeners, welcome to today’s show. I’m Eliot, the IELTS expert from Clemmonsdogpark, and it’s true, I’m not a picky eater, but I just don’t like watermelon. Today, we’re going to look at four words that are going to help you to understand the kind of language you’re going to see in the reading passages on your IELTS exam.

These words will also be useful as you’re writing responses to your task one and task two questions.

Make sure to go to the link in the show notes to get the full list of vocabulary words.

The theme for the words in today’s episode is information, and what we do with information when we think about things or when we interpret things.

Interpret

And in fact, interpret is the first word on the list. So let’s start with that one, okay?

Interpret, what does it mean?

Well, to interpret something means to make sense of something. To analyze something.

We could use it, for example, in a situation where you are trying to analyze something you’re reading or hearing in another language, a language that’s not your native language.

When you hear a word, and you are able to say it in your own language, maybe you’ll then try to explain it to a friend who doesn’t understand, you are interpreting what you hear.

But it doesn’t have to be another language, you could interpret something that’s already in your own language.

Often we use the word interpret for understanding something that’s complicated or difficult to understand, right?

So maybe you have a complicated contract you’re looking at, and maybe it’s so complicated, you need a lawyer, or somebody, to help you understand what’s there.

The lawyer is going to interpret it for you, to make sense of it, or analyze it for you.

That’s what interpret means.

Assume

The next word is assume.

To assume is to make a conclusion about something without having all of the facts or information.

We often use the word assume when we’ve discovered that we are actually thinking about the wrong thing, or we’ve made a mistake about something.

So for an example, maybe you thought a friend wasn’t coming to a party you were throwing.

But then, actually, she did arrive.

Okay so, you could say in that situation to your friend, “hey, I assumed you weren’t coming to my party, but I was so happy that you actually came.”

To assume something is to think a certain way about something, without having all the facts or information.

It does not necessarily mean you were wrong.

You can assume something and find out that you’re correct about it later. For example, maybe you assume your friend isn’t going to the party, and in fact she doesn’t go. This time her actions supported your assumption. (Assumption is the noun form of the verb “to assume” by the way. To assume is the verb.)

But, it’s to think something without having all of the facts or the information. Okay? So that’s assume.

Perceive

The next word on our list for today is to perceive.

To perceive something simply means to sense or to feel something without clear evidence.

We often use perceive when we’re taking in information that is not clear or not certain.

So for example, maybe a teacher can perceive that her students are tired or bored, right?

The students aren’t telling the teacher, hey teacher, I’m bored.

Instead the teacher is picking up clues from the student’s body language, or maybe the students are yawning—and in this way the teacher perceives that they are bored or tired.

When you perceive something, you’re taking in indirect information and trying to understand it.

So that’s perceive.

React

The final word today is to react.

To react is different than the words we’ve discussed so far because when you react to something, it’s a response.

When you react to something, it means that you respond in a particular way directly to that thing you just observed or noticed.

So for example, when we use the word react in athletics or sports, when somebody throws you the ball, you’re not going to just let it hit you, you’re going to react to it. You’re going to try to catch it.

So that’s react.

Great! In this episode you learned 4 words related to information. For more vocabulary, download the full list of vocabulary in the show notes and tune in to the next episode.

If you like our show, help us out by leaving a rating and review in and don’t forget to hit the subscribe button. Until next time! This is Naomi at Clemmonsdogpark wishing you happy studying.

Vocabulary Lesson 2: Environment

Listen and subscribe on or . Or listen right here:

In this episode of the Clemmonsdogpark IELTS podcast, your teacher Eliot Friesen explains how to use four words all related to the environment: Pollution, Erosion, Emissions, and Sustainable.

You’ll likely see this vocabulary in the reading passages on your IELTS exam.

If you like this lesson, please subscribe on or for more IELTS Vocabulary lessons!

.

IELTS Podcast – Episode 2 Transcript

Welcome to the Clemmonsdogpark IELTS Vocabulary Podcast. This is Lesson 2. In this episode, we will cover 4 words all related to the environment: Pollution, Erosion, Emissions, and Sustainable.

Don’t forget to check out our show notes for a link to your free IELTS vocabulary list containing these words and others, and visit IELTS.Clemmonsdogpark.com for more great resources to improve your IELTS band score.

Let’s get started.

I’d like to introduce you to your teacher, Eliot. He is the Clemmonsdogpark IELTS expert and, here’s a fun fact about Eliot: he’s is a scuba diver who is passionate about ocean conservation!

Eliot Intro

Hello Clemmonsdogpark IELTS podcast listeners, welcome to today’s show. I’m Eliot, the IELTS expert from Clemmonsdogpark. Today, we’re going to look at four words that you are likely to see in the reading passages on your IELTS exam.

Now, I did tell you that you don’t need to memorize all of the specialized words that you’ll see in IELTS Reading. However, it is still helpful to look at a few common words from the most common topics in IELTS Reading passages.

I’m talking about the environment and life sciences. The IELTS loves these two closely related topics.  Below are some environment and life science words that you are likely to see somewhere in the Reading section.

Make sure to go to the link in the show notes to get the full list of vocabulary words.

The theme for the words in today’s episode is the environment, and the relationship between the environment and humankind.

Pollution

So let’s get started. The first word on our list is pollution. So let’s start with that one, okay?

Pollution, what does it mean?

Well, “pollution” describes things from the human world that enter the environment and harm it. Pollution is contamination that makes the environment impure.

So one example of pollution is the garbage that we dump into the rivers and oceans.

This garbage can release toxic chemicals into the water, killing plants and animals, and destroying ecosystems.

Another example of pollution is the smoke that our cars and factories release into the air.

In many big cities around the world, the smoke from factories and cars has caused so much air pollution that the air isn’t safe to breath anymore. In these cities, you will see people wearing breathing masks to protect themselves from the pollution in the air.

When humans put harmful things into the environment, it damages the environment.

That’s pollution.

Erosion

The next word is erosion.

So “erosion” is when dirt or sand gets removed from the surface of the earth by wind or water. When dirt washes or blows away, plants die off, and ecosystems change. Erosion is what we call this process of soil being worn away, causing changes in the environment.

One example of natural erosion is the Grand Canyon in Arizona. This giant gorge was formed by the Colorado River wearing down the rock over many centuries. The erosion caused by the river is what created the beautiful canyon we see today.

Not all erosion is natural. Human activities can also often lead to erosion. When humans cut down trees, the soil beneath the trees is exposed. Without the trees to stop the wind, or the roots to hold the soil together, erosion will take place much more quickly. This is one way in which humans are responsible for erosion.

When the soil is worn away nothing can grow there anymore.

So that’s erosion.

Emissions

The next word is emissions.

“Emissions” refers to any kind of gas, smoke, or air that is released into the environment. We often use the word “emissions” to describe the pollution that humans are putting into the air.

So for example, when a factory produces smoke, we call this smoke the factory’s emissions.

Many human activities produce emissions that pollute the environment, and scientists have advised that we reduce our emissions in order to protect the planet.

One of the reasons that electric cars are becoming more popular is that they produce fewer emissions than traditional gas-burning cars.

So that’s emissions.

Sustainable

The final word for today is sustainable.

To be sustainable is to not cause damage to the environment or use up all of a resource. If an activity is sustainable it means that the activity can be continued indefinitely without environmental consequences.

Solar power is an example of a sustainable energy source. We will never run out of sunlight, and setting up solar panels doesn’t create much pollution. The fact that we can keep using solar energy without destroying the environment or completely using up the sun’s energy is what makes solar energy sustainable.

Oil is an example of an energy source that is not sustainable. Eventually we will use up all the oil stored in the earth. Drilling for oil also hurts the environment, which could one day lead to the earth becoming too damaged to continue supporting life. Oil is not sustainable.

If something’s sustainable it means we can keep doing it.

So that’s sustainable.

Great! In this episode you learned 4 words related to the environment—for more vocabulary, download the full list of vocabulary in the show notes and tune in to the next episode.

If you like our show, help us out by leaving a rating and review in and don’t forget to hit the subscribe button. Until next time! This is Naomi at Clemmonsdogpark wishing you happy studying.

Vocabulary Lesson 3: Weather

Listen and subscribe on or . Or listen right here:

In this episode of the Clemmonsdogpark IELTS podcast, your teacher Eliot Friesen explains how to use four words all related to weather: Chilly, Muggy, Balmy, and Sleet.

It’s common for questions about weather and climate to come up during the Speaking section, so we’re going to go over a few good vocab words that you can use to talk about different kinds of weather.

If you like this lesson, please subscribe on or for more IELTS Vocabulary lessons!

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IELTS Podcast – Episode 3 Transcript

Welcome to the Clemmonsdogpark IELTS Vocabulary Podcast. This is Lesson 3. In this episode, we will cover 4 words all related to weather: Chilly, Muggy, Balmy, and Sleet.

Don’t forget to check out our show notes for a link to your free IELTS vocabulary list containing these words and others, and visit IELTS.Clemmonsdogpark.com for more great resources to improve your IELTS band score.

Let’s get started.

I’d like to introduce you to your teacher, Eliot. He is the Clemmonsdogpark IELTS expert and, here’s a fun fact about Eliot: Eliot grew up in a part of the U.S. known for tornadoes and had to hide in the basement on more than one occasion.

Eliot Intro

Hello Clemmonsdogpark IELTS podcast listeners, welcome to today’s show. I’m Eliot, the IELTS expert from Clemmonsdogpark. Today, we’re going to look at four words that will be useful for the Speaking section of the IELTS. It’s common for questions about weather and climate to come up during the Speaking section, so we’re going to go over a few good vocab words that you can use to talk about different kinds of weather.

As always, make sure to go to the link in the show notes to get the full list of vocabulary words.

The theme for the words in today’s episode is weather, and ways to describe different types of weather.

Chilly

So let’s get started. The first word on our list is chilly. So let’s start with that one, okay?

Chilly…what does chilly mean?

Well, when describing weather, “chilly” means cold in a way that is uncomfortable. Chilly is similar to the word “cold”. However, we mostly use “chilly” to describe weather, or how weather makes us feel, whereas the word “cold” can be used to describe anything that’s low in temperature.

For example, on the first cold day of autumn, people would probably describe the weather as chilly. They may also describe themselves as chilly, if they happen to get caught outside without a jacket!

On the other hand, the word “cold” can be used to describe a much wider variety of things than the word chilly. When you put your leftover pizza in the refrigerator, the pizza will become cold. But we wouldn’t describe the pizza as chilly. We just use chilly to talk about weather that’s cold enough to make us uncomfortable.

So, that’s chilly.

Muggy

The next word is muggy.

Okay, “muggy” means very hot and humid. Like chilly, muggy is really only used to describe weather. This makes sense when you think about it, because air is the only thing that can be humid. Humid air is air that has a lot of water vapor in it.  So for weather to be muggy, it would have to not only be hot, but also humid.

Some climates – like the tropics – have a lot of muggy weather, while other climates – like the mountains – will almost never have weather that’s muggy. And don’t forget, humidity is a key part of what makes weather muggy. So weather in a desert climate probably wouldn’t be muggy, because even though deserts get very hot, there typically won’t be much water vapor in the air.

Like chilly weather, muggy weather can make us uncomfortable. Most people dislike muggy weather, because when the air is muggy it can be difficult to stay cool, and you get very sticky.

So that’s muggy.

Balmy

The next word is balmy.

Finally some good weather! Balmy means a comfortable outdoor temperature, not too hot and not too cold, usually with some gentle wind. We could also describe balmy weather as mild, or temperate.

Although balmy weather isn’t too hot, it’s still warm. Just think of what it’s like on a really nice day summer day, when it’s not too hot, but you don’t have to wear a jacket.

It’s no surprise that balmy weather is something that most people enjoy. For example, a lot of people choose to vacation in places where the weather is balmy, so they can enjoy spending time outside. Balmy weather is pleasant and warm, but not too hot.

So that’s balmy.

Sleet

The final word today is sleet.

So far, all of our words in this episode have been adjectives. Adjectives are words that describe something. In this case, we have been describing weather, by talking about the weather’s temperature and how it makes us feel. Sleet is different, because sleet is a noun, meaning it’s a thing rather than a description.

Sleet is a mix of snow and rain, falling together from the sky. Sleet is similar to frozen rain (which we call hail). However, sleet is not completely frozen, so it’s not solid like hail. Just imagine snow mixed with water. It’s very wet, icy snow, raining down.

You wouldn’t want to get caught outside without an umbrella and a warm coat when there’s sleet coming down. Many people also try to avoid driving their cars when sleet has been falling, because sleet can make roads icy.

So that’s sleet

Great! In this episode you learned 4 words related to weather – for more words, download the full list of vocabulary in the show notes and tune in to the next episode.

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If you like our show, help us out by leaving a rating and review in and don’t forget to hit the subscribe button. Until next time! This is Naomi at Clemmonsdogpark wishing you happy studying.

Vocabulary Lesson 4: Technology

Listen and subscribe on or . Or listen right here:

In this episode of the Clemmonsdogpark IELTS podcast, your teacher Eliot Friesen explains how to use four words all related to technology: Device, Mobile, Innovation, and Revolutionize

The topic of technology is a popular source of questions on the IELTS Speaking test.

If you like this lesson, please subscribe on or Stitcher for more IELTS Vocabulary lessons!

.

IELTS Podcast: Episode 4 Transcript

Welcome to the Clemmonsdogpark IELTS Vocabulary Podcast. This is Lesson 4. In this episode, we will cover 4 words all related to technology: Device, Mobile, Innovation, and Revolutionize.

Don’t forget to check out our show notes for a link to your free IELTS vocabulary list containing these words and others, and visit IELTS.Clemmonsdogpark.com for more great resources to improve your IELTS band score.

Let’s get started.

I’d like to introduce you to your teacher, Eliot. He is the Clemmonsdogpark IELTS expert and, here’s a fun fact about Eliot: The first piece of technology Eliot ever owned was a cassette tape player.

Eliot Intro

Hello Clemmonsdogpark IELTS podcast listeners, welcome to today’s show. I’m Eliot, the IELTS expert from Clemmonsdogpark. Today, we’re going to look at four words that will be useful for the Speaking section of the IELTS. The topic of technology is a popular source of questions on the IELTS Speaking test, so we’re going to go over a few good vocabulary words that you can use to talk about the field of technology as a whole, as well as some specific pieces of technology.

As always, make sure to go to the link in the show notes to get the full list of vocabulary words.

Once again, the theme for the words in today’s episode is technology, and ways to describe different types of technology and technological advances.

Device

So let’s get started. The first word on our list is device. So let’s start with that one, okay?

What does the word “device” mean?

Well, a device is any technological machine. I know this sounds pretty general, so let’s get a more specific look.

When we use the word “device”, we are typically speaking about an electronic item that allows people to get on the Internet, make phone calls, or possibly send messages. So usually when we say “device” we are talking about someone’s phone, or computer, or tablet. However, there are more kinds of devices than just the ones you use to connect to the Internet or call your mom.

Technically, any mechanical or electronic tool is a device. For example, while your laptop is a device, something as simple as a measuring stick is also a device. A device is any piece of technological equipment.

Don’t worry too much about being able to identify every single device. Just remember that most of the time when someone uses the word device, they’re talking about a phone or a computer. For example, you may have seen advertisements for services that allow you to watch television shows on “all of your devices.” Obviously these ads are using the word “device” to refer to things like phones, computers, and televisions – not measuring sticks!

So, that’s device.

Mobile

The next word is mobile.

What does mobile mean?

Well, the word mobile describes technology related to phones, or other wireless devices that connect to the Internet or send calls and text messages to people

So you can see there is some overlap between “mobile” and “device.” To keep things from getting confusing, let’s be really clear about the differences between these two words.

The word “device” is a noun, meaning that a device is a thing — like a cellphone or computer. The word “mobile” is an adjective, meaning it describes something.

In this case, we use the word mobile to describe anything that is a wireless device. So a television is a device. A television that can wirelessly connect to the internet is a mobile device. However, you’ll mostly hear this word, mobile, used to describe cell phones, which we also call mobile phone, or simply “mobiles.”

So that’s mobile.

Innovation

The next word is innovation.

What does innovation mean?

Well, an innovation is a new and valuable idea or an invention. The word innovation is also commonly used to refer to technological changes in general. A good way to remember the meaning of the word “innovation” is to think of an innovation as being something that is new and improved.

So, for example, when laptop computers were invented, they were considered to be a huge innovation — since before laptops came out everyone had been using clunky desktop computers. Laptops were like desktops, but new and improved.

While we can describe things outside of the field of tech using the word innovation, innovation is mostly associated with advances in technology, and that’s probably the context you will hear it used most on the IELTS.

So that’s innovation.

Revolutionize

The final word today is revolutionize.

Revolutionize, what does that mean?

Well, when referring to technology, to revolutionize means to make a big, important change in the way we use technology. To revolutionize something is to alter it dramatically, so that it is much better.

It’s easy to get confused between innovation and revolutionize, because they both involve improving technology. However, innovation is a noun (a thing) and to revolutionize is a verb (or an action). That’s one difference. Innovation does have a verb form though, which is to innovate. So we’re going to have to get more specific about the difference between these two words.

Here’s a good way to think about the difference between innovation and revolutionize: To revolutionize something is to make a widespread lasting change in a field, while an innovation is any type of new improvement, regardless of whether it makes a widespread lasting change or not. These words mean two different things, though we will often see them together.

For example, the iPhone was an innovation, which revolutionized the smartphone industry. The iPhone itself was a new and valuable invention (otherwise known as an innovation!), which changed the way people thought of phones, revolutionizing the entire phone industry.

So that’s revolutionize.

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Great! In this episode you learned 4 words related to technology–-for more vocabulary, download the full list of vocabulary in the show notes and tune in to the next episode.

If you like our show, help us out by leaving a rating and review in and don’t forget to hit the subscribe button. Until next time! This is Naomi at Clemmonsdogpark wishing you happy studying.

Vocabulary Lesson 5: Travel

Listen and subscribe on or . Or listen right here:

In this episode of the Clemmonsdogpark IELTS podcast, your teacher Eliot Friesen explains how to use four words all related to travel: Accommodation, Transport, Attractions, and High Rise.

Travel and locations are commonly discussed in IELTS Listening conversations, as well as in some IELTS Listening solo speeches.

If you like this lesson, please subscribe on or Stitcher for more IELTS Vocabulary lessons!

.

IELTS Podcast: Episode 5 Transcript

Welcome to the Clemmonsdogpark IELTS Vocabulary Podcast. This is Lesson 5. In this episode, we will cover four words, all related to travel: Accommodation, Transport, Attractions, and High Rise.

Don’t forget to check out our show notes for a link to your free IELTS vocabulary list containing these words and others, and visit us at IELTS.Clemmonsdogpark.com for more great resources to improve your IELTS band score.

Okay! Let’s get started.

I’d like to introduce you to your teacher, Eliot. He is the Clemmonsdogpark IELTS expert and, here’s a fun fact about Eliot: Although he has spent most of his life in the United States, Eliot has also lived in the Netherlands, Germany, Costa Rica, and the Dominican Republic.

Eliot Intro

Hello Clemmonsdogpark IELTS podcast listeners, welcome to today’s show. I’m Eliot, the IELTS expert from Clemmonsdogpark. Today, we’re going to look at four words that will be useful for the Listening section of the IELTS. Travel and locations are commonly discussed in IELTS Listening conversations, as well as in some IELTS Listening solo speeches. So we’re going to go over a few good vocab words that you might hear in the Listening section.

As always, make sure to go to the link in the show notes to get the full list of vocabulary words.

Once again, the theme for the words in today’s episode is travel, and things you might come across as a traveller.

Accommodation

So let’s get started. The first word on our list is accommodation. So let’s start with that one, okay?

What does the word “accommodation” mean? Well, on the IELTS, “accommodation” has two meanings.

First of all, accommodation can mean the place where you live. Maybe you live in a house. Or maybe you live on a boat. Maybe you live on a house-boat. Whatever your housing situation is, the place where you live is called your “accommodation.” It’s very likely that accommodation will be used this way in the IELTS Speaking section, where you may be asked to describe the accommodation you live in.

However, “accommodation” can also refer to the places people stay when they are travelling, places such as hotels, inns, and hostels — rather than their permanent homes. So in the IELTS Listening section, maybe an audio track is about travel, the word “accommodation” is probably being used to talk about the place someone is staying temporarily while traveling.

So, that’s accommodation.

Transport

The next word is transport.

So, what does transport mean?

Well, the word “transport” refers to the way that people move from one place to another, if they aren’t walking. In IELTS conversations, there is often talk about long distance transport, such as trains and airplanes taken to holiday destinations.

The IELTS may also include discussions about transport within a town or neighbourhood. In these cases, transport could be by a car, bicycle, scooter, or bus, which are all ways you might get to local places like work, school, or the supermarket.

Transport is the name for whatever you use to get around. So if someone asked what form of transport you use to get to school, you might say “the bus” or “my car” or “a bike”, depending on how it is that you get to school.

So that’s transport.

Attractions

The next word is attractions.

What does attractions mean?

Well, in IELTS conversations about travel and places, “attractions” refers to tourist attractions, which are interesting places that tourists like to visit.

Attractions are often places with historical or cultural value, such as cathedrals, museums, or other landmarks, like the Golden Gate Bridge in San Francisco. Attractions can also be places of great natural beauty, like the Great Barrier Reef in Australia or the Grand Canyon in Arizona.

The root of the word attractions is attract, which means to make someone interested in something. So attractions are the interesting places that tourists and travelers want to visit.

So that’s attractions.

High Rise

The final word today is high rise.

What does high rise mean?

Well, a “high rise” is a very tall building, often seen in a city center. High rise buildings are especially common in and around the main square of a city center or the downtown area. Another word for high rise is skyscraper, which you may have heard before.

Big cities like Tokyo and New York City have a lot of high rises, while smaller cities like San Francisco only have a few high rises, which are usually built in the center of the city.

If you can recognize a city just by looking at a photograph of it, you are probably recognizing the unique high rises that make up the city’s skyline. For example, the Empire State Building is one of New York City’s most recognizable high rises, and you’ll see its image on a lot of postcards from New York.

So that’s high rise.

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Great! In this episode you learned 4 words related to travel – for more words, download the full list of vocabulary in the show notes and tune in to the next episode.

If you like our show, help us out by leaving a rating and review in and don’t forget to hit the subscribe button. Until next time! This is Naomi at Clemmonsdogpark wishing you happy studying.